The Bateman Family

Batemans in Argentina

Shawn Bateman, Misionary to Argentina

August 22, 2017

“Asking Questions: Teaching Others”

Part 2

“Asking Questions: Teaching Others”

Part 2

In the last post  we looked at asking questions as an invaluable tool to the teacher or minister in teaching, leading, and motivating others.  The greatest example of this is our Savior.  All throughout the gospels, He is asking questions.  There are recorded somewhere in the neighborhood of 135 questions asked by Jesus in the gospels.

Another person who was great at teaching through questions is the Apostle Paul.  In looking at the book of Romans we can see Paul using questions to deliver his message of justification by faith.  There are around 80 questions asked in this powerful epistle of 16 chapters.  Each question is used to demonstrate his argument and message.

After spending the first chapter showing that the wrath of God is upon a guilty world, Paul opens chapter two with the first question of the Epistle.  ”And thinkest thou this, O man, that judgest them which do such things, and doest the same, that thou shalt escape the judgment of God?”  With his very first question, Paul shatters the self-righteous sentiment of the moralist and legalist.  This question signifies a change in direction of Paul’s letter, as it shifts from “The guiltiness of the pagans” to “Everyone stands guilty. 

All questions can be organized into four basic categories:

  1. Managerial Questions
  2. Rhetorical Questions
  3. Closed Questions
  4. Open Questions

As you read Paul’s letter you can see three of the four major categories of questions used.
How did Paul use these questions and how can we use them to teach others?

1. Managerial questions

Questions that keep things moving, questions to help manage your class. Paul did not have to use this type of question in his letter because he was not speaking to a live audience, but if you have a Sunday school class of, let’s say six-year-old boys, you will be using this form of questioning a lot.

2. Rhetorical questions

A rhetorical question is one that has an obvious answer. It will be used to reinforce an idea or statement, or to emphasize a point. Paul uses two very famous rhetorical questions in Romans 6:1and 6:15. The point that Paul is emphasizing here is that, as Christians, we are dead to sin.

3. Closed questions

Questions that keep things moving, questions to help manage your class. Paul did not have to use this type of question in his letter because he was not speaking to a live audience, but if you have a Sunday school class of, let’s say six-year-old boys, you will be using this form of questioning a lot.

4. Open questions

Used to promote deep thought or interaction, or to make an application. These can be used for a host of reasons. Sometimes it is good to end a lesson with an open-ended question to provoke thinking in your student body or congregation after the sermon or lesson is completed. Another wonderful example is by way of application. An example of this I believe might be found in Romans 14:10. Paul has been teaching about receiving a weaker brother (vs. 1-4) and then on to why not to judge others (vs. 5-9) and Paul uses this question in verse 10 as application to arrest their attention. In summary Paul is saying “Here is the truth presented, now why are you acting in this manner?”

Brining it Home :

 

There is an ancient proverb that says “He who ask questions can not avoid the answers.” We have the answers in God’s word. Our job as ministers and teachers is to bring the truth of God’s word to the people, and apply that truth to their lives for change and transformation. In order to do this we need to use questions, and use them effectively.

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Shawn Bateman is a Christian, husband, father, and minister of Jesus Christ. He and his family are heading to Argentina to plant churches. Please consider partnering with us as we take the Gospel to Argentina!

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Vision Baptist Missions  P.O. Box 442 Alpharetta, GA 30009 Phone: + 51993722896 Email: batemansinargentina@gmail.com